Philosophy Courses Offered — Fall 2016

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Philosophy

PHILOSOPHICUS CYCLE — Year I — AUTUMN 2016

The Weekly Schedule* of Classes during Fall Semester (Oct 5, 2016 to Jan 27, 2017) offered by the Department of Philosophy at the graduate level, is as follows:

Rome / NYC Time Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
3 PM / 9 AM P-130
4 PM / 10 AM H-100 P-200 P-130 H-100 H-100
5 PM / 11 AM P-120 P-110 P-120 P-200 P-200
6 PM / 12 Noon P-110 P-120 P-110 P-120

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For Students seeking a Certificate or M.A. in Scholastic Philosophy from the Scholasticum, they must successfully complete each of the above courses as part of the 120 credit requirement of the Philosophicus Cycle. These courses will be offered at least once every 2 years.

According to Italian Law, Students seeking a Certificate or degree, must complete all the courses in the Cycle within a 5 year period.*

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To register for any or all of these courses contact the Registrar using the Form on the Registrar’s Page.  For semester students, you can take all these courses for an expense of € 2500, for part-time students, the expense is € 150 per ECT.  Students not seeking transcripts or credits may audit any of these courses for €50 per ECT.  Audtors, during the month of October, may upgrade their status to a part-time, credit-seeking student by paying the difference in the expense of €100 per ECT, if they so decide.

All courses will be taught by live Video Conference, using GOTO Meeting’s software (free to our students). Students must acquire the textbooks from a bookstore in their own country, and have highspeed internet connection (DSL or ADSL at least), and a computer, tablet or Smart phone with a video camera, microphone and video capabilities.  Due to a lack of students in any particular course, The Scholasticum reserves the right to cancel the course; in such a case, all tuition fees for that course will be reimbursed to the Student(s).

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Course Descriptions

For more information about our rules and regulations or about these courses, see our Annuario Accademico, which you can download for free from the Registrar’s Page.  However, NOTE WELL, that the course descriptions published here take precedence over those in the Annuario’s printed edition.

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H-100 History of Philosophy: Classical Period  4 ECTS

with Prof. Matteo Scozia, A.B.D. , M.A., B.A.                Lecture

Languages in Class: English & Italian
Languages for Written Assignments: English, French, Spanish, Italian

Course Description: This course will present the ancient philosophical discourse from its pre-Socratic origins to the late neoplatonic experience. Some of the most important philosophical debates (Logic, Physics, Metaphysics, and Ethics), discussed during the classical period, will be investigated through an analytical study of the most relevant authors. In this way, several authors will be considered, such as the Presocratic philosophers, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, the schools of Epicureism, Stoicism, and Neoplatonism (Proclus and Plotinus). In presenting this historical and philosophical process a selection of primary sources will be discussed in class.

Grade to be based on:

10% Class participation
50% Written Assignments and Class Article Presentations
40% Term Paper

Text Books:

Kenny A., A New History of Western Philosophy: Ancient Philosophy, Clarendon press, Oxford, 2004.

Nota Bene: Selections from Primary Sources will be proposed as the class progresses.

Recommended Reading:

Brunschwig J. – Lloyd G. E. R., Greek Thought: A Guide to Classical Knowledge, Harvard University press, Cambridge (Mass.), 2000;
Frede M., Essays in Ancient Philosophy, Clarendon press, Oxford, 1987 (ISBN-10: 0816612757 ISBN-13: 978-0816612758)

 

P-130 Proclus Lycaeus & the Liber de Causis   —  4 ECTS

with Dr. Pilar Herráiz Oliva, Ph.D., M.A., B.A.        Mixed Method

Languages in Class: English, Spanish
Languages for Written Assignments: English, French, Italian, Spanish.

Course Description:  The aim of this course is to examine and discuss the philosophy of Proclus by paying special attention to his fundamental role in the transmission of Platonic philosophy from Antiquity to the Middle Ages. His main work, the Elements of Theology, was adapted by the Arabs and translated in the 12th century into Latin as Liber de Causis, but it was also frequently quoted as Liber Aristotelis de expositione bonitatis purae. The Liber de Causis circulated widely in the Middle Ages and it was studied and commented at the medieval universities, but its influence can be seen in thinkers as late as Hegel. Therefore, in this course, we will mainly focus on this work and its transmission, but this will be carried out without missing the scope of other extant works by Proclus.

Grade to be based on:

10% Class participation
40% Written Assignments and Class Article Presentations
50% Term Paper

Text Books:

Proclus, Elementatio Theologica. The Elements of Theology, translation by Dodds, E.R., Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1992 (2nd edition). (ISBN 10: 0198140975 / ISBN 13: 978-0198140979).
The Book of Causes: Liber De Causis. Translation by Bernardo Carlos Bazán. Marquette University Press, Milwaukee, 1984. (ISBN 10: 0874622255 ISBN 13: 978-0874622256).

Recommended reading:

Steel, C., “Proclus”, in The Cambridge History of Philosophy in Late Antiquity, vol. 2. L. Gerson (ed.), Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2015. (ISBN 10: 1107558808 ISBN 13: 978-1107558809).

Nota Bene: Selected  sources will be provided as the class progresses.

 

P-200 Patristic Philosophy  —  6 ECTS

with Dr. Enrico Moro, RF, Ph.D, MSc, BA                Lecture

Languages in Class: Italian
Languages for Written Assignments: English, Italian, Spanish, French

Course Description: The purpose of the course is to introduce patristic philosophy to students,  providing them with a basic knowledge of the most significant authors, contents, works and characteristics of ancient Christian thought (from the 2nd to the 7th century). Particular attention will therefore be paid to the presence of philosophical doctrines in the Christian context, and more in general to the attitude of early Christian thinkers towards pagan philosophy.

Grade to be based on:

10 % Participation,
40 % Assignments,
50 % Term Paper

Text Books:

C. Moreschini, Storia del pensiero cristiano tardo-antico, Con la collaborazione di F. Perono Cacciafoco, G. Catapano, S. Matteoli, B. Motta, S. Petri, P. Podolak, C. Schipani, C.O. Tommasi, Indici a cura di V. Cicero, Presentazione di G. Reale, Bompiani, Milano 2013 (ISBN: 978-8-845-27236-3)

Recommended reading:

A Companion to Ancient Philosophy, Edited by M.L. Gill and P. Pellegrin, Wiley – Blackwell, Malden – Oxford 2006 (ISBN: 978-0-631-21061-0), Parts II-V
The Wiley Blackwell Companion to Patristics, edited by K. Parry, Blackwell, Malden – Oxford 2015 (ISBN: 987-1-118-43871-8)
The Routledge Companion to Early Christian Thought, edited by D.J. Bingham, Routledge, New York – London 2010 (ISBN:978-0-415-44225-1)

 

P-110 The Philosophy of Plato  —  6 ECTS

with Dr. Francisco Romero Carrasquillo, Ph.D, MA, BA                Mixed Method

Languages in Class: English, Spanish
Languages for Written Assignments: English, Italian, Spanish, French

Course Description: After a brief introduction to the Life and works of Plato, the course will focus on his key Philosophical teachings, with particular emphasis on those which influenced the medieval Scholastics and later thinkers.

Grade to be based on:

10 % Participation,
40 % Assignments,
50 % Term Paper

Text Books: Any collected works of Plato.

Recommended reading:

Copleston, Frederick. A History of Philosophy, Vol. 1: Greece and Rome: From the Pre-Socratics to Plotinus
Pieper, Josef. Abuse of Language, Abuse of Power
__________. Leisure: The Basis of Culture
__________. The Philosophical Act
__________. Enthusiasm and Divine Madness
Sayre, Kenneth M., Plato’s Literary Garden: How to Read a Platonic Dialogue. Notre Dame, 2002.

 

P-120 The Philosophy of Aristotle  —  8 ECTS

with Dr. Francisco Romero Carrasquillo, Ph.D, MA, BA                Mixed Method

Languages in Class: English, Spanish
Languages for Written Assignments: English, Italian, Spanish, French

Course Description: After a brief introduction to the Life and works of Aristotle, the course will focus on his key Philosophical teachings, with particular emphasis on those which influenced the medieval Scholastics and later thinkers.

Grade to be based on:

10 % Participation,
40 % Assignments,
50 % Term Paper

Text Books:  Any collected works of Aristotle.

Recommended Reading:

Lear, Jonathan. The Desire to Understand. Cambridge, 1998.
Gerson, Lloyd. Aristotle and Other Platonists. Cornell, 2006.

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* Note, that Rome time is 6 hours ahead of New York City Time, except from October 30 to November 5, when it is 5 hours ahead.  Thus, 3 pm corresponds to 9 am, except during the period of October 30 to November 5th, when it corresponds to 10 am.

The Scholasticum is incorporated in Italian Law with the official name, Studium Scholasticum Onlus. It is seeking from the Ministry of Public Education, in the Republic of Italy, authorization to confer a Master’s Degree in Scholastic Philosophy on all its students who have completed the Philosophicus Cycle, described in our Annuario.  Acquisition of this authority from the Ministry is expected within 2-3 years. Students seeking a M.A. rather than a Certificate will be further required to write a Master’s Thesis.  Students seeking to complete the Philosophicus Cycle have a 5 year time span in which to do so, during which they can study as full time, semester students, or as part time ad hoc students. See our Annuario on the Registrar’s Page for more information.

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